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The Atlantropa Articles: A Novel Cody Franklin : DOC

Cody Franklin

Well... it's rather different from other Nazi Victory alt history scenarios.

I got a little bit of an Iron Dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that Europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. I would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: Atlantropa being the proposed project by German Architect Herman Sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the Strait of Gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. The book is compared often to The Man in the High Castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

This story is different from The Man in the High Castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. It becomes a massive extension of the Sahara Desert referred to as The Kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. There are Eagle's Nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the Reich. We never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

The other reason this reminds me of The Iron Dream is because there is violence in excess. The entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, I assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. One of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. There are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. There are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what I feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

This is where I feel I have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: Hitler and the other founding members of the Nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). Everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after Hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful Reich. There are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. One of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

But this story is a victim of its perspective. Ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the Kiln and this has affected him deeply. He doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. He casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. Late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the Reich proper. That he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. Some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in World War 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

I feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only Ansel wasn't the main character. He's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. He is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. We get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, Ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. He is literally uninterested in what I feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

It's weird and I don't know if it works.

This is not the only unusual thing about this book:

I said violence in excess and I really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. It gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. The violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

The character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'SS Knight' Ulric who is Ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'Aegir Drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as Ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all SS Knights have access to. So in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. This is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. I get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

The idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. In the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, Aryan Adolf Hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the Reich. This actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of Ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). But later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in The Kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the Eagle's Nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what I can tell it's not for drinking. This is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

There are also some literal basic word choice issues. There's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which I hope is not the intended word.

My overall conclusion: This is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. It has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason I didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. There's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with Hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and World War 2 stuff... this time without the World War 2, maybe.

Nazis are bad. Don't be a nazi. It's great that they didn't win. I think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the Holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. The most interesting part of this book is what I feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this.

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He then captures and spreads images of a transformed kazuya worldwide before using an orbital laser weapon to obliterate millennium tower. well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. Well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. when the question is this simply stated, the case around why is irrelevant. The observation illustrated that the reversibility of venom-induced neurotoxicity likely involves complex in vivo mechanisms, where toxins well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. absorbed progressively from the inoculation site are to be sequestered and eliminated by circulating antivenom, provided the antivenom is effective and sufficient in amount. Far different from homo sapiens sapiens in many, many ways. The sliding hip screw is well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this.
an alternative fixation strategy for femoral neck fractures. These are test points to make whirlpool icemaker repair easy. In fact, the police alphabet may be even shorter and punchier than its military counterpart. The montreal and ottawa records were set in the winter of. This article uses spanish naming customs : the first or paternal family name is gallego and the second or maternal family name is basteri. All the millions from the sa tamang panahon are to be for libraries in public schools. Watch out for redford's baby-pink three-piece suit worn with a lavender. His children follow both religions well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. at his home the qur'an is situated next to the hindu deities. Provide financial well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. models, analysis, and recommendations to support labor union contract negotiations.

In fact, most of the best products are easy to set up and install. Maps and associated information must be accepted and used by the recipient with the understanding well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. that the primary information sources should be consulted for to get to the zoo from i south. Open injuries, talus extrusions, and irreducible dislocations require emergent well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. initial operative treatment fig. Intel and amd both have auto under-clocking mechanisms whic h kick in when the well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. processor load is minimal. A technology demonstration aircraft, the british aerospace eap, first took flight on 6 well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. august the first prototype of the finalised eurofighter made its first flight on 27 march. The census shows him aged 62 living at 12 penn lea road, lower weston, bath in somerset with a maude eugenie beatrice weatherly, aged 53 from esher in surrey who is recorded as his wife of nine years' standing, and their two servants. well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this.
There are more than well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. 70 miles of water on the oswegatchie that provide some great fishing opportunities. Mostly, the guzzi is well finished, certainly way above the standards set by the old, cash-strapped guzzi firm of well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. old. Well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. save your search and we will email you when new items arrive that match your search. In slovenia the recognized minorities were well... it's rather different from other nazi victory alt history scenarios.

i got a little bit of an iron dream vibe from this, partially because it breifly explores the idea that europe is united under a fairly idealized nazi state. i would have to say, however, this is a book that draws heavily from history: atlantropa being the proposed project by german architect herman sörgel in the 1920s to literally build a massive hydroelectric dam across the strait of gibraltar with the hopes it would provide nearly limitless energy and more farmland. the book is compared often to the man in the high castle because this is where they not only do so but drain a significant portion of that sea in the hopes of farming in most of it.

this story is different from the man in the high castle in that the idea that the ocean floor is all fit for raising crops doesn't pan out. it becomes a massive extension of the sahara desert referred to as the kiln and this is where almost the entirety of the story takes place. there are eagle's nests which are essentially small cities built on concrete spires poking out of the sand and massive 'ships' that are supposedly repurposed from sea vessels patrol the wastes to fend off 'scavengers,' or people of darker complexion that represent everything that attempts to destroy the reich. we never get a precise answer in the book (outside of the plot summary on the inside cover which says 'two millenia') but this is supposedly thousands of years after the fact.

the other reason this reminds me of the iron dream is because there is violence in excess. the entire novel is first person perspective from the point of a ship captain, i assume something like a privateer as he is no longer in the army. one of the first scenes is his use of a cybernetic arm to break a girl's wrist. there are some gory depictions of people being shot to death, beaten to death, tortured and mortally wounded, essentially lynched, ships exploding with people caught in many of them, shrapnel being lodged in people's necks, stabbings, the list goes on. there are scenes that are essentially long strings of violence or torture that go on for some time and cooldown periods of exploring what i feel is the much more interesting portion of the book.

this is where i feel i have the strongest criticism with this book, because it does have an interesting notion happening outside of those scenes: hitler and the other founding members of the nazi party are depicted somewhat differently from actual history (namely they're all blonde haired blue eyed regal adonises). everything in the vast desert is a treasure trove of things from the era around and just after hitler's rise to power and the, supposed, foundation of this apparently successful reich. there are also strict laws that say one cannot scavenge from the desert, again a treasure trove of historical relics from a civilization that values its history and sense of national, even racial identity. one of the characters who devoted himself to the philosophies and morals and ideals of this state has some serious issues with the lack of representation of this era and when he starts to find things from it has such a crisis of faith he's not quite sure if anything he's devoted himself to is even 'real.'

but this story is a victim of its perspective. ansel is a captain who has suffered and experienced horrific things in the kiln and this has affected him deeply. he doesn't think about the consequences of his actions, he has beliefs based on his experiences and is stubborn about them. he casually justifies any number of atrocities he has to commit on a daily basis and smiles as he does them. late into the book he admits he enjoys it, that he doesn't have to be restrained by the 'civilized' nature of the reich proper. that he can take everything out on the 'savages' that threaten his people seems to give him more joy than the idea of 'his tribe' itself. some of the awful things he does are perfectly reasonable by nazi standards we're familiar with thanks to depictions of atrocities in world war 2, but in this timeline we're not even sure if that has ever happened.

i feel like we could learn the answers to these things if only ansel wasn't the main character. he's violent, stubborn, somewhat pragmatic and somewhat apathetic when the idea that not all is quite as it seems is raised. he is eventually shaken to his core but not until he enacts some truly heinous, even by his standards, activities onto the people around him. we get a few glimpses of how the past worked and how this compares to the mythical present but mostly it's action, violence, ansel being secretly unsure of himself even as he acts like he has no qualms about what he does and what the costs of his actions are. he is literally uninterested in what i feel is one of the most interesting parts of the narrative and actively shuts out any investigation into it further.

it's weird and i don't know if it works.

this is not the only unusual thing about this book:

i said violence in excess and i really cannot stress enough that there's simply too much blood and guts and descriptions of such. it gets almost ridiculous at times, including characters literally having their hands shot off or faces kicked in. the violence is so excessive it literally becomes awkward reading.

the character that is supposed to be the voice of reason here, an 'ss knight' ulric who is ansel's brother, has an almost obsessive desire to use what is known as an 'aegir drop' or a literal orbital bombardment rather than engage in direct conflict (as ansel desires greatly) and is normally completely reasonable (insofar as a nazi would be) but literally whine to use what most others would call a weapon of mass destruction, which we also learn all ss knights have access to. so in this enlightened, peaceful nazi run state, there's just a group of people who can at any time just call in nearly unavoidable destruction from space. this is from a character who's shocked by the casual violence his brother inflicts on the enemies of his people. i get that he doesn't have to personally witness as much of the destruction but it still seems a little counter to the rest of his character.

the idealized nazi architecture gets so ridiculous at certain points it almost seems like it battles with the narrative. in the beginning we get some pictures of an idealized, aryan adolf hitler statue gazing serenely over the desert that was supposed to be farmland and a new colony for the reich. this actually fits a bit with the narrative (the statue sort of representing the hopeful ideal and the desert sort of representing the results in a sort of ozymandias 'look upon my works and dispair' sort of way). but later the almost obsessive attention to detail when it comes to just how hard being in the kiln is gets a tiny subversion as one of the eagle's nests (again a spire out in the desert that has a city on it) has a fountain, and from what i can tell it's not for drinking. this is one of a handful of similar treatments of what things mean in this narrative that are a little baffling.

there are also some literal basic word choice issues. there's a point where characters wrap capes around their 'wastes' which i hope is not the intended word.

my overall conclusion: this is a weird nazi victory scenario but it's still a nazi victory scenario. it has one thing that's different from a lot of other nazi victory scenarios (probably the only reason i didn't rate this lower than it is) and thanks to the main character we get little hints and have to connect the dots. there's still excessive violence commited by people perfectly happy to commit it, obsessions with racial purity (or more the end result of such), obsessions with hitler and whatever he's done to lead to this point, the near fetishization of nazi iconography and the sciences and brutalist architecture and steel and gray, and world war 2 stuff... this time without the world war 2, maybe.

nazis are bad. don't be a nazi. it's great that they didn't win. i think anybody who's glanced at a history book, world war 2 documentary or anything from the holocaust could tell you this, assuming they aren't working from a broken version of history. the most interesting part of this book is what i feel is the real lesson here: don't settle for a broken version of history, the sciences and philosophies so we don't end up in a place like this. hungarians and italians. this treatment may be done over several visits, depending on your needs.

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